Frustrated Brits Waste 200 Minutes a Week Being Forced to Go Slow

Frustrated Brits Waste 200 Minutes a Week Being Forced to Go Slow
16th March 2020 admin_rooster

Frustrated Brits Waste 200 Minutes a Week Being Forced to Go Slow

Hidden Caribbean island gem St. Kitts inspires Brits to go the ‘right’ kind of slow

  • People walking slowly is Brits’ most annoying daily ‘slow’ occurrence (58%)
  • More women (48%) find their daily commute stressful than men (46%)
  • Over a fifth think about booking their next holiday during their slow commute (21%)
  • St. Kitts Tourism Authority shares its Gone Limin’ national ethos as the perfect antidote for stressed British commuters

A new study out today reveals that Brits spend on average 202 minutes (3.3 hours) a week suffering train delays, traffic jams, waiting for buses, trapped behind people glued to their screens, or caught up in unnecessary queues.

The St. Kitts Tourism Authority has shown, in a nationwide survey of 2,000 Brits, that one in ten claim they lose up to seven hours (420 minutes) a week going the ‘wrong’ kind of slow.

According to the research, the top ‘slow’ annoyances for Brits are: people walking slowly (58%); waiting in a queue for no reason (45%); waiting for a computer to load (44%); waiting on public transport (34%); and waiting for the kettle to boil (23%). Nearly half (47%) of those polled claimed they find their daily commute stressful, with women (48%) feeling the effects more than men (46%).

“It’s surprising to discover that Brits, despite always rushing around, are spending so many hours a week going the wrong kind of slow”, says Racquel Brown, CEO of the St. Kitts Tourism Authority. “In St. Kitts, us laid back Kittitians benefit from a more easy-going kind of ‘slow’ lifestyle known as Limin’ – a unique island way of kicking back and relaxing.

“We believe that, if you have to ‘go slowly’ then you should at least enjoy the view, so in response to these findings, we have launched a mesmerising hour-long slow TV showcase to help frazzled and frustrated Brits enjoy a more easy-going pace, try to de-stress on their commute to work and to learn appreciate the beauty around us.”

Filmed in real time from the front carriage of the country’s iconic Scenic Railway (the last railway in the West Indies), the footage captures a journey around the island in one smooth take. It transports Brits away from the drudgery of the typically slow commute to the island’s historic sugar cane plantations, unspoilt coastlines and the stunning Mount Liamuiga, bringing a sense of calm through the power of film.

Click here to watch the St. Kitts Slow Train video during your next commute to work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51Yz9ZnXfTY&feature=youtu.be

“Those watching,” continues Brown, “can sink into tantalising views of 135km of uninterrupted Atlantic and Caribbean coastline, watch the sumptuous green scenery roll past, and hear the relaxing sounds of the native birdlife on the island.”

The study also revealed that over a fifth (21%) spend the time during their slow commute daydreaming about booking their next holiday, with millennials (aged 18 – 24) more likely than any other age bracket to fantasise about getting away. Two fifths (41%) of respondents said their preferred holiday type was a beach break, which came out a lot higher than only 16 per cent choosing a city break.

For Brits needing a real-life escape to a Caribbean island paradise, travel to St. Kitts is quick and convenient – British Airways flies twice-weekly to the island from London Gatwick Airport, with a flight time of 10 hours. You can leave London in the morning, and be relaxing on one of St. Kitts’ beaches in the afternoon. Bliss!

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Notes to editors
2,000 Brits were polled in January 2020 by OnePoll

About St. Kitts
Intoxicating natural beauty, sunny skies, warm waters, and sandy beaches combine to make St. Kitts one of the most seductive spots in the Caribbean. Located in the northern Leeward Islands, it offers a diverse tourism product developed from the destination’s natural beauty, cultural heritage and rich history. The island’s stunning variety of tourism attractions include hiking through the tropical rainforest, riding the scenic railway that connects the island’s former sugar plantations, visiting the Caribelle Batik factory, and touring Brimstone Hill Fortress National Park, which is an UNESCO World Heritage Site. Among the more traditional vacation pastimes available are water sports including catamaran cruises, golf, shopping, tennis, dining, gaming at St. Kitts’ exclusive casino or simply relaxing on the beach.

The island is easily accessible for British travellers with twice-weekly British Airways flights from London Gatwick (with a short stop in Antigua). For more information about St. Kitts, visit www.stkittstourism.kn.